Category: Fiction

Space Dust by Lou Siday (Lucent Dreaming Issue 8)

We got into the limo. “Does this thing have a mini bar?” I joked. Nobody laughed. I attempted to flatten the creases of my dress. The car started moving, following the hearse through the wintery streets. It went slowly. Sometimes I caught the eye of a pitying stranger in the street, so I decided to look straight forward. I was

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Unseen, Unspoken and Lost by Issy Flower (Lucent Dreaming Issue 8)

The hospital is a cruel place: it lives on pain, suffering, loneliness and misery. All that can come from a human soul. There is cold shielded in shadows, threaded through tarnished grey hallways and the fixed strobe lights above sick beds. Dark doors hide broken souls, doctors moving like shades between graveyards. They barely glance at the fresh graves not

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Serving a sentence by Tithi M (Lucent Dreaming Issue 8)

She sighed in exhaustion and threw the phone towards her bed. She paced anxiously around her bedroom. Bhromor had just called to tell her that the trip had to be cancelled for now. She was in the red zone and the infection cases had increased where she lived. Rune was irritated. It had been a month since she had gotten

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The Cell by John Pietaro (Lucent Dreaming Issue 8)

“It’s so close in here, so close,” said the woman to no one in particular. “Two weeks before winter officially starts and the radiator burns like it’s mid-January…” She trailed off somberly, listening to the polyrhythmic tap dancing of rising steam. Rubbing her forehead, the woman dropped her fork suddenly, ignoring the clank-clunk that came as it bounced off the

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Vasili’s Pendant by Gary Thomson (Lucent Dreaming Issue 8)

Mervin Trumble watched the miniature clock over his television screen: Seven fifty-four. Six minutes more, and then Charlotte would be on-air for their weekly visit. She was easily his preferred shopping channel presenter now that Naomi had departed for parts unknown. That was the pattern with these women, here today, then off to who knew where for reasons they never

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Teenage Affection by Anindita Sarkar (Lucent Dreaming Issue 8)

The daylight began to fade, and the breeze speeded up a little making him curl his cold toes in contact with the damp floor. He was alone in his cabin, sitting on a stool and peering at the curvy gravel road through his window. A dusty lantern sat on his table beside the long-forgotten bowl of scratch meal containing boiled

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The Conservatory by Rosemary Doman (Lucent Dreaming Issue 8)

Each day, Emma watched for the large white van pulling up in her driveway. At first, she’d hidden herself behind the thick lounge curtains. Now she felt bolder, stronger. If her hair straggled in tousled clumps onto the shoulders of her milk stained housecoat, she no longer cared. When the conservatory walls were being fitted, she had carried the baby

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Red Shoes by Kathrine Machon (Lucent Dreaming Issue 8)

She bought the red shoes to wear to the graduate’s ball. Ankle-twisting heels and crimson satin. Tired of stirring dust in the corner with the timid girls, she wore the shoes to seal a promise of change. Now, twirling under the disco lights alone, she threw off frowns from dancing couples. She partied in them with friends on a Friday

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Bee Girl by Avra Margariti (Lucent Dreaming Issue 8)

Content warning: Eating disorders She couldn’t pinpoint the exact moment it happened, but somewhere between her sophomore and junior year of high school, Melissa had decided she was a bee. Not just any bee, either. When her hive came to collect her, Melissa would become the queen. This wasn’t to say she was a nobody. Although she was no queen

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Almost her. by Pam Knapp (Lucent Dreaming Issue 8)

Words fell like a muffled weight onto her ears and her eyes stayed fixed on his, searching for helpful meaning. He was trying to explain, but despite this combined effort to hear with her ears and eyes, his words remained little more than unconnected sounds. Her mind was busy with this and that, but mainly with the lamentable fact that

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